Jouravskite
<p style="text-align: justify;">LOCALITY: Kuruman, Northern Cape Province, South Africa 
<br /><br />1" tall 
<br /><br />This specimen is yet to be analysed. The author bought it from Luka Berkovic of Johannesburg, South Africa during a visit to his parents' home in late 2009 or early 2010. The author took possession of this piece during a second visit to Johannesburg in April 2012. Since then, this specimen has been stored in air at ambient temperature. Between around 2009 till early 2017 (and still counting), this piece has displayed no signs of instability. Ettringite slowly reacts with atmospheric carbon dioxide and the reaction product is unsightly, powdery and worthless. 
<br /><br />Dr William Pinch was of the opinion that since another piece from the same pocket at Kuruman showed no signs of chemical instability, that it would be likely to be jouravskiite. It is more chemically stable than ettringite and sturmanite; both are closely related species. Importantly, this piece is not afflicted by being coated with a layer of paraffin oil or any other unsightly matter. 
<br /><br />Photo by Matthew Webb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia</p>
description: <p style="text-align: justify;">LOCALITY: Kuruman, Northern Cape Province, South Africa <br /><br />1" tall <br /><br />This specimen is yet to be analysed. The author bought it from Luka Berkovic of Johannesburg, South Africa during a visit to his parents' home in late 2009 or early 2010. The author took possession of this piece during a second visit to Johannesburg in April 2012. Since then, this specimen has been stored in air at ambient temperature. Between around 2009 till early 2017 (and still counting), this piece has displayed no signs of instability. Ettringite slowly reacts with atmospheric carbon dioxide and the reaction product is unsightly, powdery and worthless. <br /><br />Dr William Pinch was of the opinion that since another piece from the same pocket at Kuruman showed no signs of chemical instability, that it would be likely to be jouravskiite. It is more chemically stable than ettringite and sturmanite; both are closely related species. Importantly, this piece is not afflicted by being coated with a layer of paraffin oil or any other unsightly matter. <br /><br />Photo by Matthew Webb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia</p>
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